Before booking Australian Grand Prix tickets, read about the grandstands at Albert Park, whether they're covered and have a big screen

The Australian Grand Prix is traditionally the opening race of the season. As such, the buzz around the race is enormous, as it’s the first time to see the drivers lay down the gauntlet for the season to come.

It’s often the first time to see the new machines in action too, and this will be especially true in 2022. Formula 1 will be heralding in a new era of regulations, and it really is anyone’s game in race one.

Always popular amongst Australian fans, they’ll be hoping home hero Daniel Ricciardo will be able to deliver the goods with McLaren in 2021 and beyond. Ricciardo is one of the drivers who has a grandstand named after him at Albert Park. Schumacher, Prost, Senna and Fangio are some of the legends whose names adorn the stands.

To find the perfect spot at the Australian Grand Prix, read through our Grandstand Guide before you decide which tickets to book for the race. Then, head over to our Australian Grand Prix ticket page to find your ticket.

Australian Grand Prix Grandstand Guide

The Fangio Grandstand at the beginning of the 2018 Australian Grand Prix
Copyright: Motorsport Images

Fangio Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: Yes
Numbered seating: Yes

The best view in a grandstand named after one of the best. The Fangio Grandstand – named after the great Argentine five-time world champion, lines the grid at the start-finish straight. In years gone by, this has been the place to be to see the season get underway. You’ll soak up the electric pre-race atmosphere as the cars prepare for the all-important start, as well as witness the chequered flag moment and podium celebrations. During the race, keep an eye on the pit lane. The strategy could decide the winner of the race, so you’ll want to see who pulls off an under/over-cut.

This stand stretches quite far back, so you will have a good view into the pits. But the lower rows are very close to the track, putting you almost within touching distance of the cars. Those lower rows will not benefit from the cover, but the higher seats will be covered form the elements (which is usually bright sunshine in Melbourne).

Moss Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Moss Grandstand is slightly further along the straight from the Fangio Grandstand. This is a great spot in-line with the braking spot for turn one. At the start of the race, we’ve seen excitable drivers bunch up and make contact with each other as the race gets going. But it’s also where you could see cars make a move as the approach the end of the first DRS zone of the lap.

The Moss (l) and Jones (r) Grandstands a the start of the 2018 Australian Grand Prix.
Copyright: Motorsport Images

Jones Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Jones Grandstand is next to the Moss Grandstand, in line with the turning point and apex of turn one. Here, you’ll see the cars pass through the sharp turn one and follow through the left-hander turn 2. You’ll have a good view of the cars sorting themselves out and fight for track position through the first sector.

The view from the Brabham grandstand towards turn 3.
Copyright: Motorsport Images

Brabham Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Brabham Grandstand is opposite the Jones Grandstand at Turns 1 and 2. It’s angled in such a way that the cars will approach from the main straight behind the grandstand. You will see them jostle through the first two turns and fight for the best track position out of turn two. This could be the best spot on the circuit to catch and first lap drama that may ensue.

The view you’ll see from the Piquet Grandstand, as the cars plough towards turn 3.
Copyright: Motorsport Images

Piquet Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: Yes
Numbered seating: Yes

The Piquet Grandstand is located at the exit of the tight Turn 3. Almost a hairpin, the cars decelerate hard after a long straight and DRS zone. That makes this an opportunity to overtake, albeit a risky one. This is where Fernando Alonso had a huge incident after attempting to overtake Esteban Gutierrez in 2016. Both drivers walked away, but it was a dicey moment for both. But in 2019, this is where Max Verstappen made a crucial overtake on Sebastian Vettel to claim the third spot on the podium.

Ricciardo Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: Yes
Numbered seating: Yes

This stand is named after the Honey Badger, and Formula 1’s current resident Aussie. It’s facing turn four, a slow right hander before the cars gear up to move through the high-speed sections of the track. Turn four is a right-angled turn to the left, and could be an opportunity for a driver to fight back against an overtake at the previous corner. It’s a relatively small grandstand, and covered by the elements with a big screen close by.

Clark Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Clark Grandstand is the only stand in sector 2. Prior to 2021, this was at a braking point for turn 9, a right-hand turn into a sweeping high-speed left hander and an opportunity to make a pass. But this corner has been reprofiled, and it is now much less of a corner (if a turn at all). Turn 2 will flow between turns 8 and 11, removing the chicane. That puts the Clark Grandstand in what could be one of the fastest spots on the circuit.

Waite Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No

Numbered seating: Yes

The Waite Grandstand is located on the outside of a really exciting part of the track. Following the high-speed sector two, the drivers whip the car through this high-speed chicane while maintaining as much speed as possible for the DRS zone into turn 13. Like the Clark stand, you’ll catch the cars at incredible speeds while executing precise control.

Schumacher Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No

Numbered seating: Yes

The Schumacher Grandstand is the first of four with a view of the final turn. On the outside, the cars will approach from behind the grandstand before slowing to the right hand side of the grandstand as they approach turn 15. This slows the cars right down, so you’ll get a good chance to see if any driver is brave enough to pull off a last-gasp move. The cars pick up the throttle, but not for long before they approach the final turn. The Schumacher Grandstand is also in line with the pit lane entry, so you’ll be the first to know who is pulling off a strategic stop.

The Prost Grandstand has a great view of the cars coming out of turn 16.
Copyright: Motorsport Images

Prost Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No

Numbered seating: Yes

The Prost Grandstand is next to the Schumacher one, and closer to the entry of the final turn. The drivers have to manage the throttle through turn 16: too much and they’ll go into the wall, not enough and it will compromise their speed on the straight. Drivers will aim to stay as close to each other as possible through this final turn, so they can line up a move in the DRS zone or catch a slipstream. The grandstand curve around with the corner, so you may get a few down the straight depending on where your seat is located.

The Senna Grandstand is next to the curved Prost Grandstand.
Copyright: Motosport Images

Senna Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Senna Grandstand is the first grandstand lining the straight section on the track. You’ll have a view of the pit lane and be able to track who is making a stop when. The drivers will really stand on the throttle out of the corner, and this stand is where you’ll see the cars aim for maximum acceleration into the straight.

Webber Grandstand

Big screen: Yes
Covered: No
Numbered seating: Yes

The Webber Grandstand is just along from the Senna stand. Here, the drivers will be picking up the pace for the straight section. You’ll also be on the receiving end of the roar from the grid at the start.

Fans in general admission at the Australian Grand Prix.
Copyright: Motorsport Images

General admission at the Australian Grand Prix

The Australian Grand Prix is located in the public Albert Park. As such, there are plenty of spots for general admission ticket holders. It’s actually easier to tell you where you can’t stand: the inside from turn 4 to turn 12, the outside of turns three and four, and anywhere from turn 15 to turn 1 (which is where most of the grandstands are).

We would recommend the turn 2 spots to catch the first lap action, the outside at turn 10 and 11 where the cars will reach phenomenal speeds, or anywhere at turn 3, where you can expect to see overtakes. Of course, with a three-day ticket, you can explore the circuit at your leisure and scope out the best spots on the track.

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